Before

Unique, Wearable Sculpture

A wearable sculpture artist or the other name I have is fine art fashion, the wearable sculpture is tailored for the art world, wearing and exhibiting, which is more the big dresses and the more elaborate jackets etc.

Before

About Liam Brandon Murray

So, the man behind this is Liam Brandon Murray, a UK sculptor and artist that crafts baroque-like garments formulated from deeply layered urban elements and fabrics creating an overwhelming wearable artwork. There’s so much thought put into each garment, an almost microscopical attention to every detail, stitch, and finish that make each piece one of a kind. It’s not unnoticeable that Liam often incorporates religious elements and iconography into his designs, claiming he wanted to be a religious artist as a small boy. If you look closely, you’ll see Jesus on a cross, cherub angels, and church edifices. And there’s a hidden meaning behind this, you bet.

Not only does religion take a significant part in his designs, there’s eccentric glances of what would humans wear when they come to terms with their alien origins and star heritage. Liam’s wearable pieces cover the human form top to bottom, leaving no area untouched, from gow. Liam uses a mix of different formulas he calls “a cauldron”, containing an interesting mix of materials, including liquid foam for stretch, latex, stretchy fibers, and stretchy paints, among other things. Once it’s on the fabric, he injects the back so it seals and becomes watertight.ns to hats, shoes to coats and even wedding dresses. Liam’s goal is to get the art world to recognize costume and fashion as fine art. This is rare fine art. Not often do I come across such brilliance so fit for the hottest galleries and couture runways in the global “Big Four” fashion capitals of the 21st century -Paris, Milan, London, and New York. On The World of Wearable Art editorial piece, Liam said that: “It’s my goal to get the art world to accept that as a piece of fine art. It’s just as good, if not more so, than a standing sculpture. This thing has to work, it has to move. [Costume and fashion designers] deserve more credit in the art world, I think.”